Guest Post: Plymouth Gin & Me

Blogger’s Note: Throughout the early to middle McGee books, Plymouth Gin is our hero Trav’s favorite tipple. Later on he moved to another brand, I believe Boodles. Here, guest poster Walter Abbott provides some tips for those who would like to try the classic clear English liquor.

By Walter Abbott

Before the internet came along, I had to make do with whatever gin I could buy locally—Beefeaters, Tanqueray, to name a few. Drinking Plymouth was only an impossible dream, although I would ask about it from time to time at the liquor store.

Then in the ’90s, via the internet, I found a store in Houston that would ship to me. It was the first time I had tasted the brand. Ever since, I’ve never run out. And don’t intend to ever again.

I save the Plymouth for when my wife and I travel every few months to the same beach I’ve been going to for sixty years: Panama City Beach, West End near the Bay/Walton county line. Often called “The Redneck Riviera.”

There on the balcony of my condo, overlooking the whitest sand in the entire world, I will crack open Blue, or Copper, or Lavender—whichever one in the sequence is next (I date them as I read them)—and toast JDM and Travis, and all the wonderful words that leap off the pages and into my Theater of the Mind.

It never, ever gets old.

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The evolution of the Plymouth bottle

Plymouth Gin is available online at several stores. Not all the vendors ship to all fifty states, so you have to check via Google Shopping. Worth every penny, no matter the price, in my estimation.

This is the cheapest price, but notice it only ships to about about half the states in the U.S.: http://www.internetwines.com/nsearch.html?query=Plymouth

This is the second cheapest, and it ships to almost the entire country:
http://shop.southlyndale.com/store/

I’ve bought Navy Strength and Original Strength. You can tell the difference in taste between the two. According to the Plymouth website, it is all distilled at Black Friars Distillery in Plymouth using the same recipe since 1793. If that be true, it’s the same stuff JDM enjoyed. http://plymouthgin.com/

A Century of John D. MacDonald

jdmannivshotToday marks the 100th birthday of our favorite author, John Dann MacDonald.

Just as I did two years ago—to celebrate McGee’s 50th anniversary—it’s my intention to find some lakeside watering hole this evening and toast JDM’s memory with a nice Boodles martini on the rocks. I hope that you are all able to do something similar by way of celebration.

And I’d like to think that, a century from today, people will still be celebrating this great American author, and enjoying each and every one of his twenty-one McGee adventures through their neural implants or projected on the backs of their Google-ized eyelids. And they, like us, will wish that they could spend just one tropical evening on the deck of the Busted Flush with Meyer and Trav.

A New Look for the Blog

It’s been over eight years since I posted my first piece on this blog, “Say Hello to Travis McGee.” And right from the start I knew that I wanted to keep things simple, with one of the earliest and plainest of Word Press themes, called “Kubrick.” But truth be told, I’ve gotten a little tired of Kubrick and wanted to freshen up the blog’s look.

So today, Travis McGee & Me is stepping out with a new theme and a new style. It’s called “Twenty Eleven.” It’s also fairly straightforward, but more contemporary, spacious, and (for my old eyes) easier to read. I hope you all like it.

And now, with one final look at trusty ol’ Kubrick, it’s time to move forward.

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